Bulbs · Garden Musings · Perennials · Shrubs

My Early Spring Garden

Thanks to a spring storm that brought 50+ mph winds through my landscape, I was outside a couple days ago picking up hundreds of sticks. In between endless gardener toe touches – see stick, bend over, pick up stick, stand up, repeat – I snapped a few photos of the flowers and new growth happening in my gardens. Enjoy a walk with me, and please…feel free to pick up some sticks along the way.

The floral show is beginning.

Crocus are forcing their way through the soil eager to open their blooms for hungry bees.

Daffodils are just beginning to bloom. This variety, planted in my rock garden, arrives early to spring’s party because sun-warmed rocks awaken plants here first.

Siberian squill (Scilla sibirica) are carpeting the garden under the weeping willow in brilliant blue.

Hundreds of grape hyacinths will keep the garden floor in the blue, but just a handful are blooming now.

Hellebores are blooming with abandon. I just can’t get enough of these early bloomers.

The flowers of forsythias are just starting to open. Branches will soon be lined with their glowing yellow blooms.

Most of the fuzzy flower buds on the magnolia are still closed, protecting their flowers, but this one is anxious.

And then there are a multitude of bulbs and perennials with buds ready to burst into bloom.

Chionodoxa is one of my favorite bulbs. It won’t be long before these are showing off their flowers.

Daffodils and tulips are sporting lush foliage. Daffodils will be in full bloom very soon; the tulips have yet to reveal flower buds.

Lungworts (Pulmonaria longifolia), with buds at the ready, are waiting for a few more warm days to share their flowers.

The foliage of iris and sedum is greening up the edge of the stream.

Trees and shrubs are unfolding their leaves.

I love the look of the emerging foliage of false spirea (Sorbaria sorbifolia).

Take a walk through your own early spring landscape. Enjoy the brilliant color of spring bulbs and early-blooming perennials, but don’t forget to appreciate the awakening of other plants, too. Garden with me!

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